2015 Speakers

When dark meets light

Master of ceremonies
Kaeng is an outstanding member of the TedX team who introduced our speakers, performers and entertained our audiences at the same time!
Chief Operating Officer
Brain implants for bionic vision In 2013, the World Health Organisation estimated that there were 39 million people worldwide with complete blindness. A significant proportion of these people suffer from…
Breathe Architects
Nightingale The Nightingale Model is a triple bottom line development model that delivers homes that are environmentally, socially and financially sustainable. Our ultimate goal is to provide quality urban housing…
Senior Lecturer
Innovation from Nature's Colours Devi argues that we can get smart about how we use colour by learning from animals. And the insights we can gain are not limited to…
Conflict Mediation Consultant
The courage to say sorry in healthcare Despite the skillful and committed efforts of health care professionals, there is a dark side. Humans are humans, and mistakes happen. And when…
Social entrepreneur
The birth of a word The Australian language is a colourful language. A lexicon that is admired all around the word for its uniqueness. But the origin of words is not always…
CEO
She's someone On July 21, 2013, Tracy Connelly was found brutally murdered in her home – a van in Greeves Street in St Kilda. Initially few media stories appeared, and…
Wantok Music
One saltwater people Australia is a better place for engaging and learning about out nearest neighbour. The history that we share with Papua New Guinea, the cultural trade routes stretching…
Head of learning and developement
From blinding to enlightening: helping experts to teach Have you ever been blinded by the brilliance of an expert’s thoughts and capacities? Yet, you did not learn anything? Often, the…
Consultant and trainer
Boys will be boys While life is usually bursting with opportunity and success, freedom and light, there is a darkness in all of our communities, including here in St Kilda.…
The Mother Movement
The mother movement; street gangs It takes a village to raise a child. However today’s mothers are largely raising their kids in isolation, in their own homes. This isolation affects…
Photographer & MC
John has been making a fool of himself on the stage and the page from a fairly young age. He has said of his own art that he is not a…
Artist
Charles Maimarosia contemporary music solo artist was born in Are’Are Solomon Islands on 04/04/1979. He was raised in remote Pipisu village in West Are’Are, southern part of Malaita Island, Solomon…

Master of ceremonies

Kaeng Chan

Kaeng is an outstanding member of the TedX team who introduced our speakers, performers and entertained our audiences at the same time!

Chief Operating Officer

Dr Jeanette Pritchard

Discussions on vision restoration are imperative within contemporary society.

Brain implants for bionic vision

In 2013, the World Health Organisation estimated that there were 39 million people worldwide with complete blindness. A significant proportion of these people suffer from conditions that damage either the optic nerve or the eye itself. One such condition is glaucoma, which in 2010 accounted for 4.8 million cases and is the second most common cause of blindness.

At the Vision 2020 Summit held in 2008, one thousand industry leaders met to discuss strategies and priorities for Australia’s future. Medical bionics was highlighted as an existing strength due to the worldwide success of the Cochlear hearing implant and subsequently, Monash Vision Group was awarded Federal Government funding to develop a device to bring sight to people with incurable blindness. During her talk, Jeanette will explain the importance of the Monash Vision Group approach to vision restoration and the far-reaching impact that this technology will have for the blind community and beyond.

Biography

Jeanette joined the Monash Vision Group in August 2010. She has twenty years’ experience working in medical device development, over twelve of which have been in the biotechnology industry in the UK and Australia. She completed her doctorate at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne (UK), during which she developed a clinical device for use in hospital emergency departments to diagnose patients experiencing heart attacks.

Jeanette is from Manchester in the North West of England. She relocated to Melbourne in 2006 to a role in a Victorian state government funded organisation that was investing in commercial nanotechnology developments. When the opportunity came up to join the Monash Vision Group, Jeanette was ideally placed to manage the project as, in addition to her professional expertise in medical device development, she has family members in the UK with retinitis pigmentosa and so has a personal interest in bionic vision technologies.

Breathe Architects

Jeremy Mcleod

We want to catalyse an industry change through creating demonstrative projects.

Nightingale

The Nightingale Model is a triple bottom line development model that delivers homes that are environmentally, socially and financially sustainable. Our ultimate goal is to provide quality urban housing by simplifying and humanising both the development process and the building itself. We believe that architects have an obligation to greater society to assist in protecting and enhancing the quality of our buildings and cities, for the sake of the people that inhabit them. We need to stand up for those that the industry is ignoring. The status quo development model is to build meaningless apartments designed to investor specifications for maximum yield with little or no regard for people, community or the environment. Our cities deserve beautiful, well-built and well-sized homes designed for real life.

At present, developers are not delivering this and as long as the current formula remains profitable, they do not have an incentive to do so. We want to catalyse an industry change through creating demonstrative projects that are fairly priced and designed for people. We want to redefine the meaning and quality of city life by establishing an alternate development model that is easily replicated and benefits the community and the city.


Biography

Founder and director of Breathe Architecture, Jeremy McLeod is an architect and activist with contagious enthusiasm for a sustainable and ethical future. Jeremy approaches the built environment from a holistically sustainable perspective, attempting to reconcile ecological and social design impacts within the current economic climate.

Since establishing Breathe in 2001, Jeremy has cultivated his small practice into an efficacious tool for design, planning and policy. He has directed his team in the execution of award-winning projects that span domestic and commercial scopes. Jeremy consistently presents quality architecture with renewable materials, passive solutions and low embodied energy. These priorities both underpin and characterize his work that continues to stimulate the emergence of architectural trends. Breathe’s recent multi-residential work has gained national acclaim, earning both residential and sustainability awards.

Senior Lecturer

Dr Devi Stuart-Fox

The world of colour beyond the narrow range that humans can see.

Innovation from Nature’s Colours

Devi argues that we can get smart about how we use colour by learning from animals. And the insights we can gain are not limited to enhancing beauty or getting a message across. Colour in nature has inspired technological innovation from machine vision to colour changing bandages. Devi opens our eyes to a world of colour beyond the narrow range that humans can see, and a world of possibilities.


Biography

Devi Stuart-Fox is a biologist with a passion for colour. She has travelled the globe to find out how and why nature’s diversity of colour evolved – and for this quest, she has chosen to focus on lizards – from colour changing chameleons in South Africa to Bornean gliding lizards and dragon lizards on Australia’s barren inland salt pans. She is currently an academic at the University of Melbourne and won the 2013 L’Oreal-UNESCO ‘In the footsteps of Marie Curie’ prize for women in science.

Conflict Mediation Consultant

Jeremy Limpens

When things go wrong in health care, they have disastrous effects on those involved.

The courage to say sorry in healthcare

Despite the skillful and committed efforts of health care professionals, there is a dark side. Humans are humans, and mistakes happen. And when things go wrong in health care, they have potentially disastrous effects on those involved.

Health care professional and university lecturer Jeremy Limpens challenges the health care system’s common way of responding to patients and their families when expectations haven’t been met. The current culture not only makes it difficult for patients to receive an authentic apology from health care providers where appropriate, but also prevents doctors, nurses and other staff from truly hearing a patient’s story, inhibiting their ability to say sorry in an authentic and heartfelt way.

Jeremy proposes a radical change, in which the health care system will use a method that currently yields great success in the justice system and other community settings where harm has occurred. It’s about creating a two-way open dialogue between health care professionals and those affected, using restorative practices. As a result, patients and clinical staff are able to openly discuss what happened, acknowledge the impact, say sorry where needed, learn, and mutually agree on a way forward.


Biography

Jeremy Limpens has spent close to twenty years working in health care as a senior manager, emergency and remote area nurse specialist, and paramedic across fifteen countries.

In addition to working in some of the world’s busiest emergency departments and intensive care units, he worked in various remote and isolated settings around the world. This included the Arctic Circle, aboard merchant ships, and maximum-security prisons. He also worked as a health, safety and security manager for an international aid organization, in the Australian outback and Northern Canada, and as a university lecturer in health science.

Regardless of the location, he noticed the same pattern of conflict and frustration amongst health care staff, patients and their families. He also noticed an unwillingness and inability to do something different. With is extensive experience, along with his postgraduate studies in health sciences, business and organizational behavior, conflict and restorative practice, he is dedicated to improving leadership, communication and reducing conflict within the health care sector.

Social entrepreneur

Joel Cohen

Exploring where the darkness of discrimination meets the light of positive endorsement.

The birth of a word

The Australian language is a colourful language. A lexicon that is admired all around the word for its uniqueness. But the origin of words is not always clear and technology is now speeding up the process. This is the story of the birth of a new Australian word and how it evolved in a short space of time to become an official part of the lexicon. The journey will take you from the deepest ginger to the brightest orange, set where the darkness of discrimination meets the light of positive endorsement.


Biography

Joel Cohen is a social entrepreneur based in Melbourne, Australia. He is a science graduate from the University of Melbourne who now spends most of his time starting and publishing new citizen journalism publications around Australia. He is also the co-founder of the St Kilda-based Red And Nearly Ginger Association (R.A.N.G.A.), which is the peak special interest body for ginger issues. He is a proud inheritor of red hair.

CEO

Sally Tonkin

How the power of perception can alter our opinions on others.

She’s someone

On July 21, 2013, Tracy Connelly was found brutally murdered in her home – a van in Greeves Street in St Kilda. Initially few media stories appeared, and those that did focused on Tracy’s involvement in street based sex work.

As the community at St Kilda Gatehouse reeled in shock and grief in the aftermath of the murder, they realised they had a duty to represent Tracy as the clever, funny, warm-hearted woman that she was. They believed the lack of respect and interest from the media was because they considered this attack normal and that in some way she ‘deserved’ it. Gatehouse wanted the community to know that Tracy was important and she was loved, and that her murder was part of the broader issue of violence against women.

This talk will explore the power of perception and what can happen to a community that experiences a shift in perception.


Biography

Sally Tonkin has been CEO of St Kilda Gatehouse for seven years. During this time she has significantly led the organisation through a sustained period of growth. Sally’s great passion is working with women who are facing hardship, assisting them to create hope and opportunity. Sally’s background is Occupational Therapy. Sally moved to Melbourne to undertake her Masters in International Development but instead of heading off to Afghanistan she ended up working with a group of women not too far from her own backyard.

St Kilda Gatehouse has been operating for over twenty years, providing support to those involved in street sex work as a result of hardship. It works to address the issues that lead to and keep individuals involved in street based sex work. These issues include family violence, drug addiction, homelessness, poverty, mental health and social isolation. In response to reports of an alarming number of girls and young women being commercially sexually exploited, St Kilda Gatehouse has also established the Young Women’s Project in Dandenong. This Project aims to have an early intervention approach working alongside girls and women as young as 12 years old who are affected by commercial sexual exploitation. The Project seeks to address the specific needs of these vulnerable young women to begin their recovery and avoid the trajectory to street based sex work.

Wantok Music

David Bridie

Australia is a better place for engaging and learning about out nearest neighbour.

One saltwater people

Australia is a better place for engaging and learning about out nearest neighbour. The history that we share with Papua New Guinea, the cultural trade routes stretching back thousands of years, the war time alliances, the Kiaps, the fact that PNG was Australia’s ONLY colony until forty years ago.

Our borders are, at high tide, are only 150kms apart. In this talk David will take you on a journey through PNG, through Melanesia and share with you stories, songs and why he thinks forget heading to Europe with your backpack – head to PNG instead. Embrace our neighbours, learn from them and listen to the sounds that will make your spine tingle and leave you curious and desperate to know more.

David will share with you beautiful photographs, film clips and perhaps even a live performance with artists he records and supports on the Wantok Musik Label.


Biography

David Bridie is one of Australia’s most innovative musicians and songwriters, balancing his solo music career with bands, producing, the composition of soundtrack music and running the Wantok Musik Label.

David’s career began in 1983 when he began working with guitarist John Phillips and together they went on to form seminal band, Not Drowning Waving. In 1986 on the advice of film maker and good friend Mark Worth, David went on holiday to PNG. Whilst in PNG David heard the sounds of the Stringbands, heard George Telek on a bus radio and then later met Sir George by chance in person. This first trip inspired, challenged and then set the scene for David to return two years later to begin making the groundbreaking record, Tabaran – featuring George Telek and an array of world-class PNG musicians and sounds. This passion and love for Melanesian music continues nearly thirty years on and David is now considered as one of the worlds foremost producers of Melanesian music.

Head of learning and developement

Dr Stefan Fothe

How to best pass on their expertise through lectures and workshops.

From blinding to enlightening: helping experts to teach

Have you ever been blinded by the brilliance of an expert’s thoughts and capacities? Yet, you did not learn anything? Often, the brightest minds struggle to convey their thoughts simply and clearly. And admittedly, for them that is a harder task than for most of us.

Still, in order to make their thinking accessible to others – to enlighten us – the challenge must be answered. Stefan takes you on a journey of his work with thought-leaders on how to best pass on their expertise through lectures and workshops.

These experiences have something universal to teach us: The temptation to short-cut where there is no short-cut. The reality of how long the extra-mile really is between reaching people’s minds and delivering a message at their door step. And the appreciation that clarity is almost always the result of personal modesty, resilient vision, and painful compromise.


Biography

Stefan is passionate about learning. As a Learning and Development specialist he shapes and designs learning experiences in corporate environments. He works with thought leaders from different domains and geographies to make their expertise accessible to others.
Stefan holds a PhD in Business Education. His research has focused on how people confuse knowing with knowledge, and the dramatic implications this has for ‘knowledge management’ and beliefs about corporate training.

Consultant and trainer

Danny Blay

Is systematic patriarchy failing our boys and men?

Boys will be boys

While life is usually bursting with opportunity and success, freedom and light, there is a darkness in all of our communities, including here in St Kilda. It’s more often than not a secret darkness – one that impacts on all people, of all walks of life.

The evidence is clear: one in three women experience violence from a male partner or former partner, and men are overwhelmingly responsible for family violence, but what else? How does patriarchy play a role in so many other social concerns? It can be successfully argued that patriarchy and misogyny underpins the ways in which many women are unable to have lives free of restraint, judgement or oppression. But how’s it working out for the blokes in the long run? Can it be argued that patriarchy is actually failing our boys and men? And is there another way?


Biography

Danny Blay was previously the CEO of No To Violence Male Family Violence Prevention Association (NTV) for eleven years and is a qualified Men’s Behaviour Change Program facilitator and counsellor. His key achievements included the contribution to an expanded and coordinated approach to family violence in Victoria, the development of innovative training on family violence prevention for the community sector and fostering formal working relationships with other aligned organisations and stakeholders. Danny has made significant contributions to the development of improved and innovative ways in which family violence is addressed in Victoria, including the training of sector workers. Danny also led the expansion of the Men’s Referral Service into New South Wales and has significant experience in working with government and other statutory bodies in policy development and implementation.

In a previous life Danny has been a youth and parenting support worker and has had a long association with community radio. He can now be heard regularly on 774 ABC Melbourne and in 2013 he published Drive Around The World: One Family, One Car,

One Year, One Planet (Hybrid).

The Mother Movement

Alice Morell

Today’s mothers are largely raising their kids in isolation.

The mother movement; street gangs

It takes a village to raise a child. However today’s mothers are largely raising their kids in isolation, in their own homes. This isolation affects the whole family. Street Gangs is a grass-roots initiative that builds local community networks for mums and their families. A Street Gang is simple to establish yet has a profound impact for the entire community.


Biography

After a long career in finance that moved her from the UK to Australia, the turning point for Alice came when she had a baby. She realised the extent of the role of mothers in our world and how little that is acknowledged, celebrated and supported. She started The Mother Movement that runs projects to empower all mothers. Street Gangs build local community networks for mothers and their families. Tough Mother is an annual campaign launching this year that puts dads into the shoes of mums for the weekend before Mothers’ Day, so that they can experience the role of motherhood.

Photographer & MC

John Englezos

There is privilege in being let into someone else’s world through photography

John has been making a fool of himself on the stage and the page from a fairly young age. He has said of his own art that he is not a perfectionist but more an expressionist. A writer and performer since his teenage years, John has moved from music and theatre to poetry and is a regular contributor to Melbourne’s Spoken Word scene.

Allowing others the opportunity to express themselves is equally important, so John is also a freelance photographer. He works with the credo “It is a privilege to be let into someone else’s world”.  This love of dialogue and story-telling has led to the creation of “People I Wish You Could Meet”, an ongoing photo project of those who are seeking to make a beautiful difference.

 

Artist

Charles Maimarosia

Simplicity & grace through music

Charles Maimarosia contemporary music solo artist was born in Are’Are Solomon Islands on 04/04/1979. He was raised in remote Pipisu village in West Are’Are, southern part of Malaita Island, Solomon Islands South Pacific. His parents Naomi Taraupata & Tobias Maimarosia were the first students in Solomons to attend Teachers College. He has 3 sisters & 1 brother. He was the first born son in the family & has been appointed as a chief of the Sura tribe.
Charles first began to be interested in music at the age of 5 when his father gave him a hand made Ukulele made out  of coconut shell. At this time he was surrounded by the extra ordinary ancient A’re A’re music.
From there he began singing & performing at the local church singing gospel & traditional music with the church choir & at community festivals.
He began playing ancient Are’Are panpipes (A’U) & singing ancient ancestral songs which to this day has influenced his music.
Charles was married at the young age of 17 to a local girl from his village. They have 2 sons (Francis & Derick). After Charles finished high school he collected some of the teen age boys from the local villages to perform at school & community events, this was the beginning of the band now known as Narasirato. Charles was the lead singer, choreographer & song writer of the band. The band performed traditional A’re A’re ancestral music incorporating pan pipes, tribal dancing & energetic performances.
Narasirato first performed at the Cook town festival in Australia, then went on to do festivals in Japan, Middle East & all around Australia with the help & management of Peter Keelan from Western Australia. The band recorded 2 albums. The songs on the album gained a lot of attention & popularity. The song ‘My Culture, My Life’ became number 1 hit in Asia Pacific. The 2nd album which was never released was recoded with the support of David Bridie (Telek & Waving not drowning).
In 2010 after the Black Harmony Day & Bluesfest tours with Narasirato in Australia Charles met a Russian born Australian woman & decided to leave Narasirato to start a life in Australia with his two sons who he missed dearly as he was often away for long periods of time during tours.
Charles went on to study Bachelor of Music Performance at JMC & NMIT in Melbourne. He also studied business management @ Academia International.
After all these years of music writing & performance his influences remain the same. His songs are about ancient A’re A’re ancestral music. Themes such as ‘Kanaha’ which is men chanting rituals, which is an extra ordinary communication with the spiritual world.
Ancient A’re A’re pan pipes ‘Au-Rerepi’ this pan pipe flute has 8 parts & is supposed to be played by 8 musicians in the key of G in the Blues Scale. ‘Tahana’ This ancient pan pipe is the most complicated pan pipe in the entire A’re A’re music, it is in the Jazz scale & can be played by 8 musicians.
Charles has found a unique bridge between ancestral pan pipe music & Blues tunes which he performs solo at Festivals around Australia. He has a simplicity & grace in his solo performances where he blows the pan pipe, plays chords on his guitar & sings ancestral songs.